Welcome

Ten years fighting impunity

04.10.2012 - Article

The conference “Through the Lens of Nuremberg: The International Criminal Court at its Tenth Anniversary” takes stock of the first ten years of the Court’s work.

The conference “Through the Lens of Nuremberg: The International Criminal Court at its Tenth Anniversary” takes stock of the first ten years of the Court’s work.

Logo
Logo© Internationaler Strafgerichtshof

The International Criminal Court (ICC) was founded under the Rome Statute, which was adopted in Rome on 17 July 1998 and entered into force on 1 July 2002. The ICC has jurisdiction over the most serious crimes of concern to the international community as a whole. According to the Rome Statute, these are genocide, crimes against humanity and war crimes (the decision on the crime of aggression adopted by the Review Conference in Kampala in 2010 will not enter into force until 2017 at the earliest).

In its first verdict handed down on 13 March 2012, the ICC found former militia leader Thomas Lubanga (Democratic Republic of the Congo) guilty of war crimes (recruiting child soldiers and using them to participate actively in hostilities), and sentenced him on 10 July 2012 to a 14-year prison term.

The conference will take place on Thursday, 4 October 2012. Foreign Minister Westerwelle issued the following statement:

Over the past ten years the International Criminal Court has developed into an important and internationally recognized institution. The Rome Statute represents a major step towards ending impunity. No longer should it be possible for anyone to expect to commit crimes without being brought to justice.
With its first ruling against former militia leader Thomas Lubanga for the recruitment and use of child soldiers, the ICC showed how significant it is when it comes to prosecuting the gravest crimes under international law.

Nuremberg Palace of Justice
Nuremberg Palace of Justice© Internationaler Strafgerichtshof

The conference will focus on various issues now confronting the ICC. Speakers include top ICC officials such as President Sang-Hyun Song, Chief Prosecutor Fatou Bensouda and Judge Hans-Peter Kaul as well as international experts and journalists.

Other international criminal tribunal prosecutors – Serge Brammertz from the International Criminal Tribunal for the former Yugoslavia, Hassan Jallow from the International Criminal Tribunal for Rwanda and Brenda Hollis from the Special Court for Sierra Leone – will also contribute to the discussions.

Senior government officials from Uganda and Kenya as well as representatives of the Arab League and the African Union will present critical views of the ICC and its work.

The conference is organized by the Founding Office for the Nuremberg Principles Academy in cooperation with the Wayamo Foundation and with the support of the Federal Foreign Office.

More information on the conference can be found online at www.10yearsicc-nuremberg.de.

Related content

Keywords

Top of page