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Humanitarian Aid Journalism Prize for report on refugees in Greece

The winner of the prize, Sebastian Schneider, pictured with with Dr Bärbel Kofler, Federal Government Commissioner for Human Rights Policy and Humanitarian Aid, and Manuela Roßbach, Executive Director of Aktion Deutschland Hilft, Germany’s Relief Coalition

Sebastian Schneider, winner of this year’s journalism prize, with Dr Bärbel Kofler, Federal Government Commissioner for Human Rights Policy and Humanitarian Aid, and Manuela Roßbach, Executive Director of Aktion Deutschland Hilft, Germany’s Relief Coalition., © Aktion Deutschland Hilft / Auswärtiges Amt

17.11.2018 - Article

The Humanitarian Aid Journalism Prize has been jointly awarded by the Federal Foreign Office and Aktion Deutschland Hilft, Germany’s Relief Coalition. 

 In the competition for the prize, six young journalists rose to the challenge of researching the situation of people in need in countries such as Uganda, Bangladesh and Lebanon. Sebastian Schneider has now been awarded the prize for his report on a shelter for women and child refugees in Greece. Not only did his intimate portrait of the refugees’ precarious living situation impress the jury, it also won the readers’ award.

More and more people need humanitarian aid

The competition was launched by Aktion Deutschland Hilft and the Federal Foreign Office with the aim of providing better information about humanitarian crises, while promoting new types of media reporting on humanitarian aid.

Increasing numbers of people face emergency situations as a result of ever-more and protracted conflicts and crises. According to the United Nations, 134 million people around the world currently depend on humanitarian aid. Although the media report every day on disasters and conflicts, many questions remain unanswered. In too few cases is it possible to convey the immediate real-life situation of those affected. How people in emergency situations can by helped by humanitarian aid is often not explored in a nuanced way. Furthermore, several “forgotten crises” have been taking place for many years, unnoticed by the public.

Making humanitarian aid visible

The aim of the Humanitarian Aid Journalism Prize is to fill such gaps. Six journalists were selected during the first application stage and awarded travel grants to explore the topic of humanitarian aid in depth. Working with aid organisations, they had the opportunity to view projects and to speak with the people affected and aid workers on the ground. Their reports describe people’s suffering and hopes and how they are supported by humanitarian aid.

Through their informative and personal style of reporting, the entries help readers to obtain a more comprehensive image of the situation of people in need and to learn about the many aspects of humanitarian aid.

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