Welcome

Federal Foreign Office increases aid for Mosul Iraq

Mosul: people need future prospects in the destroyed city

Mosul: people need future prospects in the destroyed city, © dpa

21.11.2017 - Article

While the terrorist militia IS has been driven out, the city still lies in ruins. Germany has pledged a further 150 million euros for humanitarian assistance and stabilisation measures.

Germany is to support reconstruction in regions of Iraq destroyed by IS with an additional 150 million euros. This aid is primarily intended to help the citizens of Mosul. Large parts of the city in northern Iraq lie in ruins following its liberation from IS’ reign of terror. 

The city liberated from IS still lies in ruins: a policeman in Mosul
The city liberated from IS still lies in ruins: a policeman in Mosul© dpa

When retreating from the city, the terrorist militia left behind a deadly legacy. Numerous mines and primed explosive charges lurk in the ruins of the city. All the while booby traps and munition are not defused, returning to the city will be hazardous for civilians. 

Giving people hope for a peaceful life

The Federal Foreign Office has now pledged a further 150 million euros of aid in order to give the people of Mosul hope for a peaceful life once again. “Citizens must have prospects of a bright future for themselves and their families,” said Foreign Minister Sigmar Gabriel. People in the region are particularly dependent on help before the winter sets in. Some 100 million euros of this sum will therefore be set aside for humanitarian aid work on the ground. These funds will be used by Germany to support the work of UN relief organisations such as the World Food Programme (WFP), the World Health Organization (WHO) and the Office of the United Nations High Commissioner for Refugees (UNHCR) in the Region.

Aid fosters stability and trust 

Humanitarian aid for refugees from Mosul
Humanitarian aid for refugees from Mosul© Michael Gottschalk/photothek.net

A further 50 million euros will go towards stabilising the region. “Only once infrastructure and the administrative apparatus are restored can terrorism be defeated in the long term,” said Gabriel. Well functioning authorities and reliable structures are essential for ensuring that reconstruction progresses and that the liberated regions develop in a stable manner. Germany is therefore using this aid to finance projects such as police training and further training in administration and governance. The United Nations Development Programme (UNDP) is an important partner in these efforts.
Germany is the second largest humanitarian donor to Iraq. In the past three years, the Federal Foreign Office has supported the people of Iraq to the tune of over 500 million euros. 

Related content

Keywords

Top of page