Welcome

The Weimar Triangle

Article

Germany, Poland and France cooperate closely in the Weimar Triangle. The foreign ministers and ministers for European affairs of the three countries meet regularly in this constellation to discuss current political issues and inject fresh impetus into specific areas of foreign and European policy.

The French, Polish and German flags outside Weimar City Hall
The French, Polish and German flags outside Weimar City Hall© picture-alliance/dpa

The Weimar Triangle shows how countries with different historical backgrounds can shape the future together, beyond borders, and work to strengthen Europe and peace in Europe. The Weimar Triangle’s great strength lies in the fact that it covers a broad spectrum of attitudes, traditions and political approaches. This forum can therefore make a valuable contribution to successful decision-making processes in a European Union now numbering 28 member states.

Foreign Ministers meeting

The foreign ministers last met in the Weimar Triangle format on 28 August 2016. Foreign Minister Steinmeier received his counterparts Jean-Marc Ayrault and Witold Waszczykowski at Ettersburg Palace by Weimar to celebrate 25 years of the Weimar Triangle. The main issues discussed at this meeting were the future of the EU, security cooperation and the peaceful solution of conflicts in Europe’s neighbourhood. Find out more about the foreign ministers meeting Here

Steinmeier, Ayrault and Waszczykowski at Ettersburg Palace
Steinmeier, Ayrault and Waszczykowski at Ettersburg Palace© Federal Foreign Office

Dialogue between the Ministers for European affairs

The ministers for European affairs last met in the Weimar Triangle format in Warsaw on 13 June 2016. The meeting focused on the refugee crisis in Europe and the forthcoming UK referendum on whether the country should remain in the EU. Find out more about the meeting in Warsaw here.

The heads of state and government also meet at irregular intervals in the Weimar format (most recently in Warsaw in 2011).

Cooperation of parliaments and ministries

Parliamentary cooperation is also playing an increasingly important role in the Weimar Triangle. Various committees meet regularly, as do the presidents of the three countries’ parliaments and their deputies.

Die Gründungsväter: Krzystof Skubiszewski, Hans-Dietrich Genscher, Roland Dumas (2003)
Die Gründungsväter: Krzystof Skubiszewski, Hans-Dietrich Genscher, Roland Dumas (2003)© www.weimarer-dreieck.com/Anne Bicher

Meetings of ministers from various government departments now also take place as part of the Weimar Triangle. For example, Federal Minister of Food and Agriculture Christian Schmidt met the agriculture ministers of Poland and France, Marek Sawicki and Stéphane Le Foll, in Bonn on 1 September 2014 to discuss the impact and consequences of the Russian import ban on agricultural products.

This trilateral exchange has also become increasingly important at the level of civil society – in the form of city twinnings, youth exchanges and cultural events. Civil society in Germany, Poland and France is united in its commitment to even closer cooperation in Europe.

Find out more:

Joint declaration issued in Weimar by the German, French and Polish foreign ministers, 29 August 1991

Keywords